Leema Dhar

Novelist, bilingual poet, columnist, motivational speaker, lover of nature and observer of human psychology, a voracious reader and a singer in creative seclusion.

Sun Sign

Capricorn

Three things people don’t know about you?

Some things should better be left unknown.

What’s your greatest fear?

I don’t wish to die without inking a part of my soul. So, I fear time is running out, and I have a lot to do!

What is your greatest achievement?

When I can satisfy the soul of my readers, and they write to me saying how much they’ve been they have transformed as a person after reading my books, I think more than all the awards and honours I’ve been bestowed with, that’s the finest achievement for me.

High point of your life?

The smile on my parents’ face when I was conferred with the Indo-Canadian Award for my contribution to English Literature.

Low point of your life

When I lost the one I was the most attached with, to cancer.

Which living person do you most admire?

Undoubtedly it has been and will always be my spiritual and creative guru, guide and philosopher for making me the person I am today- My Dad, SAMIR DHAR.

Who is your favorite fictional hero?

Shams of Tabriz from the book The Forty Rules Of Love by Elif Shafak

Who is your favorite fictional villain?

Fred from The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

Who are your favorite authors?

Anita Desai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Khaled Hosseini, Elif Shafak, Paulo Coelho And Mitch Albom.

What are your 5 favorite books of all time?

The Village By The Sea by Anita Desai, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri, The Forty Rules Of Love by Elif Shafak, A Prison Diary by Jeffery Archer, All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr.

Is there a book you love to reread?

The Forty Rules Of Love by Elif Shafak & Samuel Beckett’s Play ‘Waiting For Godot’.

What are your 5 favorite movies of all time?

The Lovely Bones, Before Sunrise, Moonlight, Blood Ties and To Kill A Mockingbird.

One Superpower you wish you had?

To disappear and watch the world go by.

Your epitaph would read? /Last line in your biography would be?

A misfit romantic soul lies trapped in the arms of seclusion and noise.

If you had a time machine to take you back to any country and any time period, where would you choose to be for your childhood, adolosent , adult life and silver years?

A place, that’s far away from the populated land, where only nature mothers me. I haven’t been there yet but I somehow feel connected to New Zealand so maybe I would spend my life there in a small cottage aloof with my thoughts.

If you could acquire any talent, what would it be?

To decipher the secret coding between what one says and what one feels deep inside.

Which book you wish you had written ?

The Forty Rules of Love

When and where do you write ?

In my room on my laptop (sometimes I even pen thoughts in my diary) between 10 p.m. to 3 a.m.

Silence or music?

Silence is far more musical than music can ever be… provided you’ve the 'ears'.

One phrase that you use most often?

And death kissed him like a silent lover.

Do you have a writing ritual / superstition?

I close my eyes and mediate for a few minutes before I sit down to write. It’s been a ritual since I was four.

What’s your guilty reading pleasure?

Salem Falls by Jodi Picoult

Do you have one sentence of advice for new writers?

Write to satisfy the hunger of your own soul. Success will follow its route. Remember if at the end of the story you have laughter or tears, the readers are bound to laugh or cry with you.

At the age of just 22, she has skillfully written SEVEN BOOKS, including FIVE NOVELS. All India radio and popular Indian youth magazine Youth Action conferred on her the title of the ‘Youth Icon’. Honoured in the 28th International Conference of the authors from India and Canada (2015) she became the News Maker of 2012 and 2015. The recipient of ‘Women Achiever Award’ and bestselling author of Till We Meet Again, The Girl Who Kissed The Snake, and You Touched My Heart Leema Dhar, is currently pursuing her Final Year Post-Graduation in English Literature.

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