Title : The Sales Room

 Author : R.T. Manu Ramesh

thesalesroom

Blurb : Rajesh Iyer, a young, ambitious salesperson, returns to nThe Sales Roomi of Oregon Software Technologies after an aborted attempt at getting into a business school in the US, only to notice the metamorphosis of the software start-up which he had earlier been an integral part of. What used to be a rat-infested hole in the midst of a vegetable market is now a swanky, state of the art facility owned by an upcoming Bollywood star. The enthusiastic and compact team firing on all cylinders is replaced by a sclerotic and bureaucratic set up. Sales review meetings, once rife with passionate discussions, are now replete with profanities. The ill tempered angel investor’s scream can be heard all the way from his villa in New York.

Rajesh, now shunted into an innocuous role finds every effort made to alleviate the condition of the demoralized sales team, met with resistance. As revenues dwindle and tempers rise, Rajesh realizes he is running out of time and options. He either toes the CEO, Venky’s line and becomes party to a sham or quits citing a host of plausible reasons. This hilarious narrative takes the reader from plush corporate boardrooms of Bangalore to the seedy hotels in Delhi as Oregon meanders in search of illusory customer wins. Rajesh meets several interesting characters ranging from the busty Polish graphics designer to the loquacious pimp masquerading as a taxi driver.”

My view : In the beginning, author introduces readers with the clients and workers of Oregon Software Technology.His introduction of an individual doesn’t end in a line nor  in two, and not even in a paragraph.He kept on speaking about the person until he picks up a witty remark to stick on the character’s biography.The witty remarks he used in every next paragraph would grasp reader’s attention more and more,as he/she progresses’ ahead in search of more such scoops of hilarious dose.After going through couple of pages, reader could easily understand what he/she would get to learn from this book, and he prepares himself/herself for the upcoming hilarious lines in advance.

I found some fillers participating in the book like description of terms related  to sales, although author has given brief on them so that reader would be able to comprehend the situation when the term is used ahead in the story.But for me, it was an overstretched details, as readers are less interested to know what a sales report contains, until and unless they are reading a sales management book.A one-line description would have done the work.

This book will change your outlook towards sales and Salesperson, your perception drawn towards them might take a 180 degree turn through the insight author has provided to you.The story he has picked to bring light on the topic of sales, and to change the ideology every individual has about the salesperson is very-well knitted.If by chance,the story fails to strike any chord in reader’s heart, it will definitely strike  all the vivacious chords, through the notorious comments he made.

Author’s competence lies in picking up life’s events that any one could relate, but not any would be able to share with such ease and poise.He’s one such writer who without having the support of story could entertain reader  by delivering amusing and rollicking events of day-to-day life.That’s the only reason, I want to read more of his writings in future.Readers are always in a search of such writers, who could bring out impish life out of nothing.Honestly, the story didn’t charm me as much as the minuscule anecdotes he dropped from his bag of experience.

An enjoyable read where you can freely enjoy funny takes on various episodes of life.Bring peace to your mind through this hilarious journey.

Source :-  http://madhyapradesh.johntext.de/review-of-the-sales-room/

Book Manu Ramesh’s novel is inspired by his own stints in start-ups and software companies

He can fit into the oddball directory in the technology field with a ‘smarketing’ expertise at that. Though there is a mushrooming of young writers these days, R.T. Manu Ramesh has made a mark with his very first novel, The Sales Roomwhich more or less reflects the “story of start-up companies” as he likes to put it.

Ask him what was his objective in writing this novel, which at the outset seems totally geared to the marketing side of corporate professionals, and Manu says, “More than in a successful company, you can learn a lot from a sinking ship (software company). This apart, my own exposure and experience in the early days of my career with start-up companies made me come to the conclusion that I can tell the story of such fledglings, their identity crises and the fall-out they have on all those working there. The sales people are the worst-hit since they are in the line of fire. Virtually marketing reigns supreme in buoying up a firm or drowning it. The latter can be suicidal to the marketing lot who go down with it when it sinks. At first, I thought the book will relate to my genre, but then a lot more readers gave feedback that they found an interesting read that gave them a peek into an orbit they had not inhabited so far.”

A few chapters give us a feel that the author had a non-Indian readership in view which is rather strange if the novel was not conceived in the United States or UK. “It was conceived and took shape in a matter of four months, during my breaks between switching jobs in and around 2011, very much in Bangalore. This was a milieu familiar to me since I was born and brought up in the city. I could identify with my colleagues and places which figure in the novel as well. The ethos was what I could relate to easily and give a realistic touch to the otherwise fictional work,” he clarifies admitting that it was written with a foreign readership in view as well. The chapters launching into a wide explanation of something as simple as a ‘PWD’ department for instance or the chapter on ‘Vaastu’ (age-old science/art of construction) and more so on software companies, their identities, etc. (pages 118-119), are obviously geared to educate a cross-section of readers.

The book runs like a diary in the life of marketing personnel with a detailed account of their day-to-day happenings in the company, their lifestyle, their pleasures and professional miseries and above all the camaraderie. Replete with conversations, at times bordering on profanity (the new fad in novel writing), the book makes for racy reading. Sardonic comments like “rats are the most insensitive creatures in the world, second only to sales people (who don’t really have a choice)” (page 20) or harmless humour that refers to the choice of myriad delectable deities of Hinduism to worship vis-à-vis Islam or Christianity that route out short-cuts to reaching God (page 36), reflect the author’s sense of humour and skepticism.

“But then, the novel was never drafted with design, it was pure inspiration,” clarifies Manu, an engineering graduate from Bangalore.

The book is available on Amazon and there is an ebook available too. Published by Frog Books, an imprint of Leadstart Publishing Pvt Ltd in 2013 (email: info@leadstartcorp.com), it is priced at Rs.145 (US $ 6).

RANEE KUMAR

Source : http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-metroplus/from-the-domain-of-marketing/article5852347.ece

  • The idea for this novel came when Manu Ramesh was working for a start-up firm. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
    The HinduThe idea for this novel came when Manu Ramesh was working for a start-up firm. Photo: K. Murali Kumar
  • The Sales Room by Manu Ramesh
    Special ArrangementThe Sales Room by Manu Ramesh

R.T. Manu Ramesh’s debut novel offers a humorous take into the world of failing startups

We have seen numerous books, blogs and websites that extol the values of a start-up that has been successful, has managed to capture the attention of the world and reap dividends for the founders. However, the world seldom reads or hears of start-ups that do not succeed, and it is a peek into the world of failing start-ups that entrepreneur-turned-author R.T. Manu Ramesh seeks to throw light on in his debut novel, The Sales Room.

The idea for this novel came when Manu was working for a start-up firm. “I learnt about the issues that start-up companies face, especially in India. Funding is always a major problem, venture capitalists are wary of releasing funds. Finding good people to manage the show is also difficult. You need to inculcate the fire-in-the-belly sensation about your business idea to other people in the team too. Though it does take into account some of my life experiences, this book is a work of fiction.”

The key to running a good start-up, Manu argues is the ability to trust and find people with integrity. “In a big company, systems are present that prevent any major breach of trust. A start-up cannot afford lapses of integrity. If a start-up has to fail, it must be due to the non-viability of the business plan, not because of the lack of integrity of its founders.”

He adds: “I have made an effort to make the tone of the book as humorous as possible. It is modelled on books such as Catch 22, which brought dark humour into something as serious as the Second World War. It is for people working in the corporate sector. For people outside the corporate culture, it is a light read that gives a sneak peek into the topsy-turvy world of start-ups.”

Manu contends: “I feel that humour has a greater impact in getting the message across. I wanted it to be a humorous read, with the serious message. I wrote the book from the perspective of a salesman, since sales is the most important part of any start-up firm. If the sales team is not up the mark, it is tough for a start-up to have an impact.”

The book was completed in a stretch over four months. “I quit my job and embarked on full time writing. I enjoyed the experience. I read a lot, though not as much as I would want to. As a child, I liked reading Enid Blyton and am Catch 22a fan of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight Children.”

Indian writing in English is growing at an exponential pace and Manu is thrilled about it. “There are many stories waiting to be told. India is a land of many idiosyncrasies which make for many stories and plots. Time and again, Indians have produced excellent works in English.”

The Sales Room has been published by Frog Books and is priced at Rs. 145.

Source : http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/starting-trouble/article5883249.ece

The Sales Room by R T Manu Ramesh.

Disclaimer: I got a copy of this book from the publishers on behest of the author for an honest review of the same.
So when Manu first reached out to me, asking me to review a “humorous novel about a failing start-up based in Bangalore”, three words struck me. Humorous. Start-Up. Bangalore. How could I refuse?
A very quick racy read – giving us a tongue-firmly-in-cheek look (or “thumb-firmly-up-the-ass, as the protagonist of Sales Room is wont to say) about a start-up based in Bangalore doomed to failure. The Sales Room brings to fore “all the action inside the ‘sales room’ – a no-holds barred parda-fash (the expose for those not familiar with hindi) and a behind-the-scenes look at all the levers and triggers that work behind running a start-up – all this from the scathing sarcastic point of view of a 26-year old engineer – with B-School aspirations – and a firmly unforgiving outlook on all the malpractices that keep sales in an IT Firm afloat.
Chock-a-block with astute observations about the sales process – especially all the dirty secrets in the cupboards that come pouring out in buckets-full – Manu probably bases this on an auto-biographical sketch. But those hanky-panky idiosyncrasies that lend colour to all the familiar characters we would typically see in an IT firm is a riot to read about. His writing lends them credence, a three-dimensional realism that resonates with the readers.
So the hoi-polloi who make up the general populace at an IT Firm? You know them. You walk past their cubicles. You see them puffing away at that small stub of a cigarette like its going to spark one last innovation that will change their lives. You seen them slink away from the coffee machine furtively avoiding their bosses eyes. Manu here presents them in full techni-colour. Complete with footnotes:
The one-track mind boss obsessed with positioning his products as “premium” in spite of a clear lack of quality and his hatred of B-school grads bordering on psychosomatic antipathy and his blind buff confidence that often lands him in a soup. Check.
The hyperventilating investor boss as the “Face” of the disgruntled senior management who loves venting out his frustration of being bossed over by his wife at home – by screaming at everyone else. Yes. Based out of the land of dreams, America. And screaming down the hierarchy at the “bloody” Indians for being non-competent at selling and thus making the investors some money. Check.
The multi-ethnic dreamy writer who heads the marketing division and can’t wait to get out – frustrated by the pseudo-intellectualism around him and the constant bull-shit piled on by the stupid boss. Check.
The engineering head who doesn’t know his C from A and B. [ For the non-engineers, C is a programming language. Yes. It is.] and who gets by clearly by a term, we corporates call “ass-licking”. Check.
The frustrated whiney bottomless pit of neediness Engineer. Who loves his rum too much. And who is probably the only exception to the “Chain of Screaming” [ ie the chain is broken at him and doesn’t get passed around anymore] – Check.
Throw in a couple of ladies. Yeah. The Good looking dumb chick with no lines who keeps the morale up in the office. And of course the bimbo with bazookas to keep something else up. Check.
And top it all off with the narrator. A twenty-six year old “tam-brahm” vying for an admission in the top 10 B-schools of the world and now back for the second stint in a firm that is like a Broken Arrow. Loose cannon without any direction or focus.
With such a load of characters from your everyday walk of life [especially if you are like me. In marketing operations for an IT Product firm where I deal with such guys day in and out] you know you have a top-class entertaining book. Manu throws in case studies one after the other about how sales ought NOT to be done for an IT start-up firm. It ought to be a cult classic with the sales folks around in India – the last chapter being a nail in the coffin of this fictional firm. I did think Manu walked a tightrope in terms of making it sound funny and yet keep it believable. Especially the excessively annoying habit of the narrator to get into lurid descriptions of the female anatomy to convey his frustrations at the inept boss. Some situations are seriously funny while some come across as just too exaggerated to be true. But hey, you never know. Selling in India, as the author puts it, is a completely different ballgame. If I were you though, a reader in the “sales room”, then I would pay attention to those last chapters. Rajesh, the first-person narrator spewing some wisdom after having played a non-committal role being just a mirror-image and mouth-piece for his quirky office-mates. And yeah – being set in Bangalore, Manu deftly captures the everyday scenes and minutiae that make up this silicon valley of India.
There definitely was another drawback but it could be a personal matter. The fact that while Rajesh’s background is alluded to ( his father being a Secretary of State?) we never really are privy to Rajesh’s thoughts. He comes across as a cold unsympathetic SOB with only a CYA [ Cover Your Ass. In other words, be self centred. And ensure your boat floats.] policy for most decisions taken in a firm. So yeah, your main narrator is this unemotional unattached chap who gets wet dreams about..well just about anything female and walks on two legs. Could be a turn-off but Manu’s easy flow of events and the humour helps ease things a bit.
Overall, I ain’t crooning that this is going to be your mantra to selling – but it forms a powerful medium giving us a “dekho” into the ever-turbulent sales room where all the decisions that could kill or maim the economy takes place. I enjoyed it a lot. It’s daft. It’s tongue-in-cheek. It’s irreverent to the core. And no, it’s not about selling.
Source : http://fantasy-smorgasbord.blogspot.in/2014/10/the-sales-room-by-r-t-manu-ramesh.html

The Sales Room: Book Review

Sep 252014

 

 

A Humours account of an IT Startup  :  The Sales Room

Ok this post has nothing about travels except for the fantasy land escape it offers to you into the mind of 26-year-old Ramesh, a sales manager in a struggling IT project management company.

Now normally I would not worry about reading a book that is largely about the sexual fantasies of a 26-year-old single, ambitious,  and confused guy who cannot decide whether to pursue his dream of a US MBA or to continue to work for the company that is still a start-up even after 10 years. But having my fair share of working for start-ups and actively reading through their proposals that I read ( most of which are very similar and want to make you richer than Bill Gates overnight, but talk nothing about product, market, strategy or consumer needs ), I decided to give it a read when the author T R Manu Ramesh contacted me. And I am glad that I did, not that it is a Pulitzer Prize winning material but it tells The sales room Manu Rameshyou candid inside story of many Indian IT start-ups where the aim is to sell it to the big VC fund by hook or crook.  Nobody is worried about solving a problem, but how to make a fool out of the customer.

Oregon Software is one such company, where everybody is sticking around for that one day when somebody with deep pockets will buy them and they will all retire on some fancy beach town. But “Oregon, We have A Problem !- We are not able to sell”    So primarily that is what ails Oregon Software Technologies, and author Manu Ramesh accounts for in this hilarious book The Sales Room.

  So we get a firsthand account of what kind of strategies the company tries to adapt, re-adapt and keep on changing like seasons. The book unfolds more like a personal diary of Ramesh, who takes us through his aspirations, fears, but mostly through his wet dreams in the most graphic way you can imagine or would have read as a teenager. At times it is hilarious but at times it is very predictable as we have all done it (Males I mean) as part of growing up.

But you do get a lot of insight on how come some companies fail to grow up and are classical case studies on what not to do. Oregon is one such company which, even though a startup has all the maladies of a large bureaucratic organization. The company is on a drip, with Surya the angel investor sitting in USA calling the shots without every taking in cognizance the ground realities of India.

While I liked the out of the box narrative that reminds you of the crude college comedies of USA, it is the authors attempt to educate the reader (Americans I presume) in all aspects of Hindu mythology that breaks the narrative. But I suggest you do not skip pages, as it is here his creative brilliance and way of looking at our gods in a very objective (or derogatory take your pick depending on your belief system or sense of humor), shines.

Do give it a read if you want to relive the authors (or yours ) unapologetic  fantasies, interspersed with some firsthand account of working of desi Startups, waiting for their Knight in shining armor to come and write the big fat cheque. You may not laugh all the way to bank, but you surely will laugh.

-Source : http://desitraveler.com/sales-room-book-review/

Review of “The Sales Room” by “R.T. Manu Ramesh”

Blurb: Rajesh Iyer, a young, ambitious salesperson, returns to The Sales Room of Oregon Software Technologies after an aborted attempt at getting into a business school in the US, only to notice the metamorphosis of the software start-up which he had earlier been an integral part of. What used to be a rat-infested hole in the midst of a vegetable market is now a swanky, state of the art facility owned by an upcoming Bollywood star. The enthusiastic and compact team firing on all cylinders is replaced by a sclerotic and bureaucratic set up. Sales review meetings, once rife with passionate discussions, are now replete with profanities. The ill-tempered angel investor’s scream can be heard all the way from his villa in New York.
Rajesh, now shunted into an innocuous role finds every effort made to alleviate the condition of the demoralized sales team, met with resistance. As revenues dwindle and tempers rise, Rajesh realizes he is running out of time and options. He either toes the CEO, Venky’s line and becomes party to a sham or quits citing a host of plausible reasons. This hilarious narrative takes the reader from plush corporate boardrooms of Bangalore to the seedy hotels in Delhi as Oregon meanders in search of illusory customer wins. Rajesh meets several interesting characters ranging from the busty Polish graphics designer to the loquacious pimp masquerading as a taxi driver.
 
 
Verdict: ‘The Sales Room’ is the first work of R.T. Manu Ramesh. The Sales Room is a book that will give the readers a chance to know how things work with the sales persons or will make them see how the sales department works. From his own experiences the author has very successfully jotted down a hilarious novel.
The cover is exactly what the storyline is. What we non-sales persons know about sales is that the most important matter is to make profit and the cover says it all and will surely attract more non-sales people like me. The name seems perfect to me because it won’t make the reader confused about the content but will give them the exact feel for the book.
Any reader can easily dump the book by concluding that this book is all about sales but I would like to tell them not to, because this book has a lot to offer rather than just the word ‘sales’. The main protagonist Rajesh Iyer came back to Oregon Software Technologies to give his career a new dimension after his failed attempt at MBA. The life of Rajesh will take the readers to a journey where they can notice what a sales person has to do to seal a deal, how much struggle he have to do to save his job (read ass) and that too in a funny way which will keep the readers entertained. From the wire-chewing rats to the vastu savvy boss everything is presented in an interesting way.
The readers will appreciate the author’s observation power because of the way the he has described his scenes and formed his characters. If you leave a bunch of guys in a sales room with loads of target to achieve, the main topic of their discussion in off time will be sex and girls, these scenes are so real that any reader can easily relate to the scene and can visualize everything happening right in front of them.
I would have called this book a perfect entertainer if the author would’ve concentrated a bit more on creating his characters. The extra number of characters in the story line will end up confusing readers. At times the story line fell weak but the author’s humorous narrating style keep the things going. The most important point of the book is, it is different, something out of the box which will force the readers to turn the pages till the end to know what this author has to offer. I spotted a few editing errors and spelling misstates too which can be ignored if compared with the flow.
Final Words: The observation power of the author has taken this book to a new level. This book has the capability to inspire people and will entertain them too. A unique in its genre.
Title: The Sales Room
Author: R.T. Manu Ramesh
Publisher: Leadstart Publication
Page Count: 196
My Rating: 3.75/5
Source : http://www.timidfingers.blogspot.in/2014/08/review-of-sales-room-by-rt-manu-ramesh.html

BOOK REVIEW: THE SALES ROOM BY R. T. MANU RAMESH

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  • Today, in an all new session of THE READING ROOM, we are going to review The Sales Room by  R.T. Manu Ramesh

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  • Book Description

 

Rajesh Iyer, a young, ambitious salesperson, returns to “The Sales Room” of Oregon Software Technologies after an aborted attempt at getting into a business school in the US, only to notice the metamorphosis of the software start-up which he had earlier been an integral part of. What used to be a rat-infested hole in the midst of a vegetable market is now a swanky, state of the art facility owned by an upcoming Bollywood star. The enthusiastic and compact team firing on all cylinders is replaced by a sclerotic and bureaucratic set up. Sales review meetings, once rife with passionate discussions, are now replete with profanities. The ill tempered angel investor’s scream can be heard all the way from his villa in New York.

Rajesh, now shunted into an innocuous role finds every effort made to alleviate the condition of the demoralized sales team, met with resistance. As revenues dwindle and tempers rise, Rajesh realizes he is running out of time and options. He either toes the CEO, Venky’s line and becomes party to a sham or quits citing a host of plausible reasons. This hilarious narrative takes the reader from plush corporate boardrooms of Bangalore to the seedy hotels in Delhi as Oregon meanders in search of illusory customer wins. Rajesh meets several interesting characters ranging from the busty Polish graphics designer to the loquacious pimp masquerading as a taxi driver.

 

  • My View

Hilary Hinton “Zig” Ziglar, an American author, salesman, and motivational speaker, was quoted as saying:

“The top salesperson in the organization probably missed more sales than 90% of the sales people on the team, but they also made more calls than the others made.”

Yeah I believe, that’s legitimately true on behalf of CEO of Oregon Software Technologies, Venky. The author, R.T. Manu Ramesh, who too is a part of the Sales and Marketing team in his real life, has penned down an incredibly witty and quite inspiring tale of a young man, named Rajesh Iyer, who being the protagonist, narrates his journey in Oregon Software Technologies while working in the Sales and Marketing team, in his new debut book, The Sales Room.

 

Synopsis:

Rajesh Iyer is a very ambitious young TamBrahm (Tamil Brahmin) man, who returns to Oregon Software Technologies after a failed attempt to get into a business school in the US. And thus begins his second stint as the Manager in the Sales and Marketing team in Oregon. The CEO, Venky and the investors Surya and his daughter, of Oregon, wanted the Sales team representatives to shove down their only “successful” software down the throats of various reputed public and private sectors clients. And Rajesh narrates each and every negotiation/failure to sell Oregon’s only project management product with zest and humor. From Rajesh’s weird sexual fantasies to his dreams to get an MBA degree from top ten B-schools in the US, the story evolves captivatingly. The climax was perfect; Rajesh can be an epitome of a role-model for many young enthusiastic entrepreneurs who want to put their dreams on the first gear like Rajesh and not getting stuck in one place only.

 

Positive Points:

Firstly, a huge applause to the author, R.T. Manu Ramesh, who has crafted this tale so passionately and it is quite evident that he is quite a story-teller. The author’s primary character, Rajesh is funny and witty characters. His thoughts and dialogues are the biggest USP of the book. The author has given us the detailed insights into the sales and marketing world of a software company, and how they grow up the success leaders, all are left exposed by the author. The story will make you go ROFL completely till the very end and keep you engaged from the very start of the book. From Rajesh’s best friend, Girish’s ranting about being a Bolly scriptwriter to Raja’s crying about his wife losing too much blood in childbirth to Venky’s stupidity and arrogance and belief on Vaastu, the total book is complete package of laughter.

Negative Points:

Firstly, I didn’t like the author’s use of too many sexist comments towards women. Secondly, I really lost track, when Rajesh went to his first date with Sonal. If there were more accounts of Rajesh and Sonal’s affair, then the story would have been more interesting.

 

  • My rating: 4.2/5

 

Title: The Sales Room

Author: R.T. Manu Ramesh

ISBN-10: 938247398X

ISBN-13: 9789382473985

Genre: Fiction>>Humor

Publisher: Leadstart Publishing Pvt Ltd

Source : http://wordbite.com/2014/08/21/book-review-the-sales-room-by-t-manu-ramesh/

Book Review – The Sales Room, Author – R. T. Manu Ramesh

July 27, 2014

SALES – The quizzical 5 lettered word, not many people harbour a positive attitude towards the ones associated with this The Sales Roomphenomenon. Be it a sales call or a salesperson, a negatively irritating aroma prevails as soon as someone deciphers this eclipsed word.

Nevertheless, there are certain norms accepted within society as a misconception and then, there comes a time, when such misconceptions need to be torn apart and behead towards constructing new realms. The book – The Sales Room by R.T. Manu Ramesh is one such initiative.

The book helps you peek inside the psyche of a sales man and understand his persona. Obviously, having said this, all sales people are not ‘all shit’. They are also living and human beings with a body and a brain (and of-course, other vital organs, which are a proof of them belonging to human species).

The story is about a re-recruited field representative, Rajesh Iyer who rejoins his old organisation, with a hope of securing a better future full of opportunities. Ironically, he is bound to quit, one more time! Why? The answer is not as straight as the question, itself is. There is more to be learnt and derived in and around this man, before the actual reason unveils.

As soon as you set out to your field visit with this lad, you are introduced to job environment, job security and job prospects, with altogether a different perspective.

Before you start reading the book, my advice is, just unlearn what you already learnt about sales and related functions and responsibilities, then learn afresh as you read the book and visit – The Sales Room, with him and lastly; unlearn what you just learnt, after completing the book! Why?

This is because this book is a satirical humour about the organizational structure and more precisely the sales department. The author introduces you to his team, his work culture, his working style and to miss – his challenges, as well.

You will be amazed to read that how these people try hard and work to convert ‘leads’ into ‘sales’. Irony is; they are forced (or sometimes guided) to work out-of-the-way, in order to sack a deal and save their ass. But, no strings attached, they know how to face bottlenecks and come out victorious without any serious efforts – after all; they have that ‘S’ factor in them.

The daily life and routine of a sales rep is described aptly. How he is influenced to use his personal contacts, how he is pushed into difficult situations and how he struggles hard to follow his passion admist the mean people surrounding him; people who donot give a damn about the sales funnel, each and every incident is a slap on age-old customs and philosophies of driving business.

The author has used a different , a characteristically different style of writing that you will not find to read, generally. Such a style needs precision in observation and explanation. Undoubtedly, he has nailed it. The descriptions of people and developments is close to reality and easily relateable.

Indeed, a transparent attempt to provide a clarity of vision from – the sales room!

About the Book:

Rajesh Iyer, a young, ambitious salesperson, returns to “The Sales Room” of Oregon Software Technologies after an aborted attempt at getting into a business school in the US, only to notice the metamorphosis of the software start-up which he had earlier been an integral part of. What used to be a rat-infested hole in the midst of a vegetable market is now a swanky, state of the art facility owned by an upcoming Bollywood star. The enthusiastic and compact team firing on all cylinders is replaced by a sclerotic and bureaucratic set up. Sales review meetings, once rife with passionate discussions, are now replete with profanities. The ill tempered angel investor’s scream can be heard all the way from his villa in New York.

Rajesh, now shunted into an innocuous role finds every effort made to alleviate the condition of the demoralized sales team, met with resistance. As revenues dwindle and tempers rise, Rajesh realizes he is running out of time and options. He either toes the CEO, Venky’s line and becomes a party to a sham or quits citing a host of plausible reasons. This hilarious narrative takes the reader from plush corporate boardrooms of Bangalore to the seedy hotels in Delhi as Oregon meanders in search of illusory customer wins. Rajesh meets several interesting characters ranging from the busty Polish graphics designer to the loquacious pimp masquerading as a taxi driver.

Source : http://booksnewsindia.wordpress.com/2014/07/27/book-review-the-sales-room-author-r-t-manu-ramesh/

 

The Sales Room by RT Manu Ramesh: a review

To begin with, how many of you have an idea of The Sales Room? Or maybe how many of you have been into the sales room? Especially of a startup? This book by RT Manu Ramesh surely speaks about the Sales room and everything in detail through the example of his time at a startup firm. The cover does its best in describing what the book is all about and so does the blurb…
On the back cover- Rajesh Iyer, a young, ambitious salesperson, returns to “The Sales Room” of Oregon Software technologies after an aborted attempt at getting into a business school in the US, only to notice the metamorphosis of the software start-up which he had earlier been an integral part of. What used to be a rat-infested hole in the midst of a vegetable market is now a swanky, state of art facility owned by an upcoming Bollywood star. The enthusiastic and compact team firing on all cylinders is replaces by a sclerotic and bureaucratic setup. Sales review meetings, once rife with passionate discussions, are now replete with profanities. The ill tempered angel investor’s scream can be heard all the way from his villa in New York. Rajesh, now shunted into an innocuous role finds every effort made to alleviate the condition of the demoralized sales team, met with resistance. As revenues dwindle and tempers rise, Rajesh realized he is running out of time and options. He either toes the CEO, Venky’s line and becomes party to a sham or quits citing a host of plausible reasons. This hilarious narrative takes the reader from plush corporate boardrooms of Bangalore to the seedy hotels of Delhi as Oregon meanders in search of illusory customer wins. Rajesh meets several interesting characters ranging from the busty Polish graphics designer to the loquacious pimp masquerading as a taxi driver.
 
Told through the eyes of Rajesh Iyer, the book is a testimony of what an ideal Sales Room is like. Likeminded people sharing topics ranging from anything to everything. It’s totally a visual of what a typical sales room is or rather what it should be.
Written in a quirky yet fun narrative, the author does his best in describing the scenes and giving it an interesting feel. The way the author, throughout the book, has interacted with the readers makes the reader’s feel that even they are a part of the book.
Typical guys discussing about stuff not related to the work is also well thought of, which gives the readers a feeling of reality. The usages of very easy English along with colloquially used Hindi words also make the book reader friendly. I would call this book a very interesting comedy which gives every reader an idea about life at the sales room of a software startup.
To say about the facts I didn’t like about the book is that it had too many characters which, at a point of time, can confuse the readers to an extent. Apart from that, the fact that the writer could’ve written it in a more strong way, with a more important storyline, stayed with me till the end of the book.
Yes, there were spelling and grammar mistakes too but the other facts topped over it. The end of the book was quite nice. All in all, enjoying the book till the very last line and waiting to read more of the writer, I would like to rate the book 3.75 out of 5.
Source : http://vanyasnotebook.blogspot.in/2014/08/the-sales-room-by-rt-manu-ramesh-review.html

 

The sales room reviewed by Deccan Chronicle

The Sales Room featured by The Hindu on 7 April 2014

 

The Hindu reviewed The Sales Room on 31 march 2014