Book Review: A Window Seat by Vishala Katta

 
Introduction

  • ISIN:  9789352016198
  • Genre: Fiction / Drama
  • Publishers: Leadstart
  • Price: Rs. 250/- (I got this book from the publisher for a review)
When a dying corporate professional escapes into a train to somewhere, he finds himself become a storyteller of old mythological tales. Tagging along is ten year old Hari who is looking for his parents he lost in the trains. Together their adventures lead them to debating with priests, dancing with eunuchs, sharing meals and conversing casually about death with random strangers. A runaway wife tags along with these annoying mavericks. Taking her first train she is all ready to be an actress. That night, what begins as a harmless conversation changes their fate completely. What makes them hold on to each other for longer? Do they find what they were looking for? What happens when they bump into each other few years later? But do all of them make it alive? A window seat is all about those conversations with strangers that seem to change you unknowingly.

Behind the book

About the Author

Vishala Katta writes about the untold stories that ordinary people carry on their shoulders. She finds extreme gleeful childlike pleasure in conversations with strangers and other creatures that choose to respond. Originally, an engineer, she set out to pursue her love for Communications at Mudra Institute of Communication, (MICA) Ahmedabad. She is currently residing in Delhi doing her daily corporate grind as a marketing and communications professional. While most of her day is spent on her seat at work, the rest of the time she is busy lecturing her better half about feminism and travelling to places with the sound of water.

Me thinks

First things first – this book has one of the most amazing covers I have seen in recent times and that’s the biggest factor that drew me to the book in the first place. That fascinating cover along with the blurb seemed too inviting to ignore!I love traveling and somehow this book seemed to be that perfect cure for my wanderlust after a long holiday when my heart was just pining for more. The premise of the book is very ordinary if I say so what is extra-ordinary is the narrative. We all feel lost at times in life and that is where this story is born. Three lost souls on a journey to find the deeper meaning of life and on the way they change things for many other souls as well.

Somewhere there lies a lot of “between the lines” reading in this book. It isn’t what it sounds like, if I can say so safely without sounding weird. This book has the strange air that hangs around us long after an incident is over. Not the ones that hold the memories but the ones that hold the incident and the smells associated with it, fresh as if it never got over. I like her language, lucid yet agile in a manner that it moves swiftly from one story to another and still sounds like one story. The descriptions vivid make you travel along the lead characters.

The beginning though a little slow does pick up pace later on and you just want to know what happened to all three of them. Did they find the meaning of life? Did they survive the ordeal to tell their story? And a whole lot of other questions that haunt you till you turn the last page of the book. Overall for a debut a superb book, devoid of any editing loopholes with a story that is stellar and power packed with liberal doses of romance, tragedy, action, emotions and drama this one is a perfect entertainer that leaves behind lot of lessons for every one.

Recommended for everyone who enjoys redefining life and looks for the extra-ordinary in the ordinary!

Source :- http://www.privytrifles.co.in/2016/08/book-review-window-seat-by-vishala-katta.html

Book Review #48: A Window Seat

Name: A Window Seat
Author: Vishala Katta
No. of Pages: 249
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: Frog Books (An Imprint of Leadstart Publishing Pvt. Ltd.)
Price: Rs. 250/-
Published in: 2016How did I get it? From the publisher.THE BLURB SAYS: 
When a dying corporate professional escapes into a train to somewhere, he finds himself become a storyteller of old mythological tales. Tagging along is ten year old Hari who is looking for his parents he lost in the trains.

Together their adventures lead them to debating with priests, dancing with eunuchs, sharing meals and conversing casually about death with random strangers.

A runaway wife tags along with these annoying mavericks. Taking her first train she is all ready to be an actress.

That night, what begins as a harmless conversations changes their fate completely.

What makes them hold on to each other for longer? Do they find what they were looking for? What happens when they bump into each other few years later? But do all of them make it alive?
A window seat is all about those conversations with strangers that seem to change you unknowingly.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 
Vishala Katta writes about the untold stories that ordinary people carry on their shoulders. She finds extreme gleeful childlike pleasure in conversations with strangers and other creatures that choose to respond. Originally, an engineer, she set out to pursue her love for Communications at Mudra Institute of Communication, (MICA) Ahmedabad. She is currently residing in Delhi doing her daily corporate grind as a marketing and communications professional. While most of her day is spent on her seat at work, the rest of the time she is busy lecturing her better half about feminism and travelling to places with the sound of water.
MY THOUGHTS: 
I was quite excited by the blurb. The plot seemed offbeat and interesting. The cover also looked nice with the chugging train.
Stalin is the dying corporate, Hari is the ten-year-old urchin and Kuhu is the runaway bride. The story started out well with Stalin.He is suffering from incurable cancer and so decides to travel, looking for a miracle. His religious debates also were interesting. But he didn’t turn out to be the storyteller the blurb promised.
Kuhu’s part also started well, but somehow some things were absurd in her story. Like she is asked to visit a dead relative’s family alone, in a distant town on the very second day of her wedding. She goes to the railway station alone in the evening (it is very near from her husband’s home) in a new place, dressed in an obvious newlywed’s attire. Her husband sees her off from home only. At the end, I actually felt sorry for him.
How Hari lost his parents in the train is not very convincing. And nobody noticed a lost boy at the stations is also not very convincing.
The plot had potential but the story didn’t turn out to captivating. I was actually a little disappointed.
 I give “A Window Seat” 2.5 stars on a scale of 5. 
This book has been published by Leadstart Publishing. If you are a new author and want to get published, send in your manuscripts at submissions@leadstartcorp.com

Source :- http://natashazwords.blogspot.in/2016/08/book-review-48-window-seat.html

Vishala Katta’s Story – A Window Seat

When I see people go about their struggles with absolute no encouragement and acknowledgement I feel inspired by their actions. Everyone has a story to tell and everybody’s life can be a movie…

 

Vishala Katta loves observing people and believes that she can read body languages and expressions very well. Reading between the lines got her to write “A Window Seat”, a contemporary fiction novel about three runaways who meet each other in a train journey.

 

“A runaway wife, a dying corporate professional and a little boy looking for his parents begin to feel connected to each other for the few moments they spend together. A Window Seat is all about conversations with strangers that seem to change you unknowingly,” says Vishala.

 

“Come to think of it I can easily see this book made into a movie with Priyanka Chopra and Hrithik Roshan!” she adds.

 

What makes them hold on to each other for longer? Do they find what they were looking for? What happens when they bump into each other few years later? But do all of them make it alive?

 

You will have to read the book for all the answers!

 

vishala-kattas-story-by-the-a-window-seat-1

Every day I would play “Langdi” with a set of friends, toppling and moving a stone with one leg..one of those days, I walked into a community library that opened up..and I guess never walked out!

 

A marketing and communications specialist from MICA, she is currently working in the financial services sector. “Not as boring as it sounds, but life gets better after work hours!” says the author. In her free time, Vishala is reading, writing or backpacking with her husband and gang. She is inspired by nature, flowing water, and travel besides being strongly opinionated on feminism! The author says that she did not research for ‘A Window Seat’. It just flowed from the people she knew and met. Vishala also writes about these ‘(Un) common man stories’ on her blog.

 

They say behind every successful man is a woman. But behind that successful woman is also a man who believed in her!

 

Vishala believes that her family has been extremely important in motivating her to write the book. And the men in her family have pushed her to do better. “My Father made me independent, from the start, which has shaped me into the woman that I am now. My brother taught me how to do things slowly and perfectly and my husband inspired me to leave everything aside and write the book,” says the author.

 

The Hardest part of writing the book was to decide the ending.

 

Vishala took the longest time to decide how the book should end. “I enjoyed fighting and brainstorming with my husband on how it should turn up!” she says. With an amazing ending, ‘A Window Seat’ is a very relatable book. “It will make you will feel like somebody you know from ages is sitting with you in a relaxed room and telling you a story he went through,” she adds.

 

If I wasn’t working, I would have been extremely lazy and wouldn’t have bothered to write!

 

The author balances her work and personal life well and believes that it keeps her busy and productive. She recommends aspiring authors to start writing now. “Life is short. Pick that dem pen & paper begin immediately! It’s never about the grammar, language or even the sentences. It’s about what you want to convey from those words. And believe me it’s easy,” she ends by saying.

Source :- http://feministaa.com/2016/08/23/vishala-kattas-story-a-window-seat/

BOOK REVIEW : A WINDOW SEAT BY VISHALA KATTA

A Window Seat is a wonderful story written by the author Vishala Katta.The story revolves around the conversation with strangers that seem to change youunknowingly.This is my first book of Vishala Katta that I have read and its the bestbook.While reading the book,I got totally lost into it.It is a must read guys.

a-window-seat

Book : A Window Seat

Author : Vishala Katta

MRP : Rs 250

Amazon Buy Link

Storyline :
A Window Seat is a fabulous story about three runaways and one journey.When a dying corporate professional escapes into a train to somewhere,he finds himself become a story teller of old mythological tales.There is ten years old Hari who is looking for his parents and he got lost in the train.

They debate with priests,dance with eunuchs,share meals with each other and do conversations about death with the random strangers so casually.

A runaway wife joins these annoying mavericks.She takes her first train to be an actress.

That night,that harmless conversations changes their fate totally.

Guys read this awesome book to know what makes them hold on to each other for longer?Do they achieved what they were finding?What happens when they meet each other after few years?But do all of them make it alive?
You will get all your answers when you will read this book.

So,what are you waiting for guys?Buy this book now to know what all happened in the story.Each character of the story is described so beautifully.I appreciate the way Vishala has put the life in the words to make the characters more realistic.

Happy Reading!!

Source :- https://mypassionplanet.wordpress.com/2016/08/21/book-review-a-window-seat-by-vishala-katta/

Book Review – A Window Seat, by Vishala Katta

Buying Link: Amazon
Publishers: Frog Books, an imprint of Leadstart Publishing
Blurb: “When a dying corporate professional escapes into a train to somewhere, he finds himself become a storyteller of old mythological tales. Tagging along is ten year old Hari who is looking for his parents he lost in the trains. Together their adventures lead them to debating with priests, dancing with eunuchs, sharing meals and conversing casually about death with random strangers. A runaway wife tags along with these annoying mavericks. Taking her first train she is all ready to be an actress. That night, what begins as a harmless conversations changes their fate completely. What makes them hold on to each other for longer? Do they find what they were looking for? What happens when they bump into each other few years later? But do all of them make it alive? A window seat is all about those conversations with strangers that seem to change you unknowingly.”
I had written earlier on these pages about the influence of previously-successful authors on the writing style and genre selection of contemporary Indian authors. The success of romance (as exemplified by Chetan Bhagat and Durjoy Datta) and mythological fiction (Amish Tripathi) led to a gentle rain of imitations that threaten to become a tropical shower, washing away what is good about Indian Literature.
So when an Indian author tries to do something different, as with C Suresh’s satire ‘A Dog Eat Dog-food World’, Shiv Ramdas’s Sci-Fi “Domechild” or Aindrila Roy’s venture into urban horror with ‘I See You’, it is an effort worthy of appreciation. For the most part, however, quality Indian literature has remained confined to the realm of high-brow literary fiction.
Vishala Katta’s “A Window Seat” is an attempt to break out of the mould, avoiding conventional topics to tell a complex story about a train journey that connects three otherwise-dissimilar individuals.
Plot
The plot revolves around Kuhu, a village girl who dreams of becoming a famous Bollywood actress, Stalin, a young corporate professional who on finding he has only a few months to live, embarks on a journey in search of a miracle, and Hari, a boy of about ten who has been lost on a platform and seeks his parents.
Through the course of the book’s 251-page length, the author tries to bring out the internal strife of Stalin and Kuhu, and how their choices lead them to come closer to each other while seeking an understanding of life.
The theme is semi-spiritual, and the author’s use of a day-and-a-half spent together on a train journey through the interiors of India is ambitious and interesting. The differences between the poor rural bride who wants everything, and the rich city man who is questioning the very nature of materialism are brought to the surface.
Characters
The three main characters are etched well, though Kuhu is probably a sharper portrait than Stalin or Hari. Kuhu, especially, as an out-and-out self-absorbed, gold-digging woman, is a brave and unusual choice of protagonist for a novel. Stalin’s motivations are clearly depicted, but his actions are quite random and difficult to justify, even in the context of the novel. Hari ends up reduced to an afterthought, unfortunately, and his story could have been expanded to make a more coherent whole.
Writing
If having a good plot or storyline was all it took to write a good book, the publishing world would be a happier place. But treatment of the story is as important as the story itself, if the essence has to be brought to the readers. “A Window Seat” suffers from shortcomings that are probably common to many debut writers. There is a considerable amount of ‘tell’, rather than show, and the readers are consistently informed of what Kuhu, Hari and Stalin are thinking, rather than those aspects being brought out through the narration itself. Successive paragraphs of dialogue are spoken by the same person, with speech tags in each one, which gets rather confusing rather quickly. Certain words are overused – ‘maverick’, for instance, pops up every few pages after the halfway point in the book. As a narrator, there is definitely scope for improvement, and as a reader, I sincerely hope that the author’s definite ability and ambition as a storyteller is soon matched by her skill in writing.
The little things
Editing issues do niggle in a few places, but these are not many.
Conclusion
‘A Window Seat’ is an interesting attempt at a different kind of story-telling, spinning a tale of three disparate characters and storylines brought together in a train journey. However, the shortcomings make it difficult to recommend to a broad audience.

- See more at: http://percytheslacker.blogspot.in/2016/08/book-review-window-seat-by-vishala-katta.html#sthash.qLrHYedE.dpuf

About the Author
Vishala Katta writes about the untold stories that ordinary people carry on their shoulders. She finds extreme gleeful childlike pleasure in conversations with strangers and other creatures that choose to respond. Originally, an engineer, she set out to pursue her love for Communications at Mudra Institute of Communication, (MICA) Ahmedabad. She is currently residing in Delhi doing her daily corporate grind as a marketing and communications professional. While most of her day is spent on her seat at work, the rest of the time she is busy lecturing her better half about feminism and travelling to places with the sound of water.

- See more at: http://percytheslacker.blogspot.in/2016/08/book-review-window-seat-by-vishala-katta.html#sthash.qLrHYedE.dpuf

Source :- http://percytheslacker.blogspot.in/2016/08/book-review-window-seat-by-vishala-katta.html

Book Review: A Window Seat by Vishala Katta

Book: A Window Seat: Three Runaways| One Journey| One Ending
Author: Vishala Katta
Publisher: Frog Publisher
Pages: 251
Price: Rs 250
Genre: Fiction
Vishala Katta writes about the untold stories that ordinary people carry on their shoulders. She finds extreme gleeful childlike pleasure in conversations with strangers and other creatures that choose to respond. Originally, an engineer, she set out to pursue her love for Communications at Mudra Institute of Communication, (MICA) Ahmedabad. She is currently residing in Delhi doing her daily corporate grind as a marketing and communications professional. While most of her day is spent on her seat at work, the rest of the time she is busy lecturing her better half about feminism and travelling to places with the sound of water.

Vishala has come this time with new story “A Window Seat” as the name and cover itself suggest it is story about three runaways who are trying to find their destiny.
When a dying corporate professional escapes into a train to somewhere, he finds himself become a storyteller of old mythological tales. Tagging along is ten year old Hari who is looking for his parents he lost in the trains. Together their adventures lead them to debating with priests, dancing with eunuchs, sharing meals and conversing casually about death with random strangers.
A runaway wife tags along with these annoying mavericks. Taking her first train she is all ready to be an actress. That night, what begins as a harmless conversations changes their fate completely. What makes them hold on to each other for longer? Do they find what they were looking for? What happens when they bump into each other few years later? But do all of them make it alive? A window seat is all about those conversations with strangers that seem to change you unknowingly.
Vishala get the idea of theme of book, when she saw daily people go about their struggles with absolute no encouragement and acknowledgement she felt inspired by their actions.  Everyone has a story to tell and everybody’s life can be a movie.
Vishala thinks that this script is ready to be casted. So, if this book were a movie she totally see Hrithik Roshan ( as the young corporate professional turned maverick ), Priyanka Chopra ( Runaway wife on her way to be an actress ) and Darsheel ( Looking for his parents he lost ).
Now, on my personal point of view this is one of the best book I have read lately. When reading the book I was myself sitting on A Window Seat in a train. I was so lost in this well knit story that I was not able to contemplate when I reached my destination.  I would love to see A Window Seat as movie.
“There is no shame in doing the right thing , even if its too late.”
― Vishala Katta, A Window Seat

Source :- http://www.techphlie.com/2016/08/book-review-window-seat-by-vishala-katta.html